After spending almost three hours trying to get Bioshock (the first game) working on my Windows 10 computer (upgraded from Windows 7), I determined that the issue was related to the initialisation of the audio device (regardless of what the audio device actually is / was). I’ve got a Creative Sound Blaster Audigy sound card, an onboard Realtek HD Audio sound card, the NVIDIA audio controller (courtesy of my NVIDIA GTX 560), Total Recorder audio drivers, e2eSoft audio drivers and a Logitech G930 gaming headset. No matter what combination of default devices etc that I tried, nothing ever worked.

Two things did work though.

  1. Disabling all the sound devices (in the Windows Device Manager and the Sound / Recording options)
  2. Starting the game with the -nosound switch (added to the launch options for Bioshock, on steam).

So that pretty much nailed it down. After a little more research on the internet, I discovered an audio initialisation was carried out at the very beginning of the execution of the game, during the developer intro.

Here’s another switch: -nointro.

Apparently the sound device initialization carried out at the very start, is simply used for displaying the developer intro. When you start the actual game, a separate audio initialisation is carried out.

Who needs to see the developer intro every time they start the game? I certainly don’t.

So I added this to the launch options for Bioshock, on steam

  • -nointro

Started the game, no issues. Set my resolution to max, changed my audio to 7.1 (to suit my Logitech G930) and off I went to Rapture!

No other changes, no compatibility mode, no run as administrator, no additional drivers (I’m not using / have never used OpenAL, Rapture3D) installed and no changes to Bioshock configuration files.

Of course, if you have a non-steam version of the game, you could create a shortcut to the bioshock.exe file and add -nointro to the end of the Target line, in the properties of the shortcut and start the game from the shortcut. Did I mention the word shortcut ;-P

This may not work for everyone, as I’ve seen some really ridiculous fixes (seriously, stuff that just doesn’t make sense, like plugging headphones into the microphone port) apparently get Bioshock working for others, so consider this solution to be just as crazy as all the others.

Happy to provide assistance with this solution in the comments. Have fun!

Over the past three weeks, I have spent considerable time trying to get Apple’s latest Mac OS X offering (Mavericks) working on non-apple hardware. Mainly because Apple had released it for free (are you coming to the show, Microsoft?) and my old Snow Leopard OS X computer was starting to get… well, long in the tooth 😉

As I said, three weeks. Obviously I wasn’t working on it for three weeks night and day, but I did spend a fair amount of time to get to the configuration I am using to write this very post. Not much of this post actually pertains to the fact that I installed Mac OS X Mavericks on a Toshiba Laptop, it’s more that I couldn’t find many posts that mentioned any type of PC or laptop, so I figured there had to be others like me out there, possibly with a Toshiba laptop, trying to install Mac OS X Mavericks on it.

Warning!

The following is my journey. It comes with absolutely no warranty of any kind and I do not accept any responsibility at all, regardless of you following my instructions to the letter or not, if this results negatively for you in some way. Back up all data and proceed at your own risk.

Installation Media

To get the installation media from Apple, you need an existing Mac with at least Mac OS X 10.6 and AppStore installed. My 10.3 SL, was not going to cut it. Why couldn’t I update? My 10.3 SL machine, has an Intel atom processor that is no longer supported in newer releases of Mac OS X. I tried anyway, it failed. Thankfully, I was able to restore from a Time Machine backup. Use Time Machine! It’s awesome!

I ended up a little off course, but to get Apple OS X Mavericks, I downloaded a VMWare Virtual Machine image with Mac OS X Mavericks already installed. Your adventure with VMWare Workstation and OSX Mavericks, starts here: http://www.souldevteam.net/blog/2013/10/06/os-x-mavericks-10-9-retail-vmware-image-release-notes-links/. There is a video on the blog post, Watch It And Pay Attention!

You will also need VMWare Workstation. The 30 day trial is completely unrestricted and works perfectly fine. I am running VMWare Workstation 10.0.1 at the time of writing. You’ll see in the video (and downloaded files) that earlier versions of VMWare Workstation are also supported. Your adventure with VMWare Workstation, starts here: https://my.vmware.com/web/vmware/info/slug/desktop_end_user_computing/vmware_workstation/10_0.

Note: You must use VMWare Workstation for Windows, on Windows. VMware Workstation will need to be patched (unlocked), to be able to run Mac OS X Mavericks. The patch that accompanies the VMWare Workstation image is designed for Windows, not for Linux. Sorry, Linux users. If you’re clever enough, you might be able to get it to work on Linux. I haven’t look into this at all. Let me know if you are successful.

Once you have VMWare Workstation installed with your Mac OS X Mavericks virtual machine running, use the AppStore to download Mac OS X Mavericks 10.9, for free!

Of course, if  you have access to an actual Mac or a Hackintosh with Mac OS X 10.6 or higher, you are home free. Install the AppStore if you haven’t done so already and download Mac OS X Mavericks, for free!

Note: To download Mac OS X Mavericks, you will need to be signed into an Apple account. Just an FYI. It’s no big deal. An account is free and you don’t need to have a credit card or any payment options set up to download Mac OS X Mavericks. It’s free, really!

Once you have Mac OS X Mavericks downloaded, don’t install it. It looks like an App, and may try to install itself (even though you may be on Mac OS X Mavericks already). If it does, just cancel the install.

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