You can use the following Microsoft Technet Article as a guide for installing Live Communication Server 2005. Remember, that before installing Live Communication Server 2005, you need:

  1. At least one server with Windows 2003 & SP1 or Windows 2003 R2 (preferred).
  2. Active Directory and DNS.
  3. SQL Server 2000 & SP3a (Enterprise or Standard)

Install Live Communications Server 2005 Enterprise Edition

This brief guide assumes that you already have a domain controller configured with DNS, or a domain controller configured and a DNS server configured.

If required, you can install Microsoft Exchange 2003 and Active Directory (with DNS) on the same machine. Once you have your server (or servers) prepared, be sure to note down your domain name, and Administrator password.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a3318f57 … .aspx

Step 1 – Prepare a Server for Microsoft Exchange

Install Additional Windows Components

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124295.aspx

Step 2 – Prepare the Forest for Microsoft Exchange

You will need to run the following command: setup /ForestPrep

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124110.aspx

Step 3 – Prepare the Domain for Microsoft Exchange

You will need to run the following command: setup /ForestPrep

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997526.aspx

Step 4 – Install Microsoft Exchange

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb124186.aspx

News Flash! -:- Newer Version of This Guide based on CentOS 5.3 (32/64bit) and VMware Server 1.0.9 Available Here

So you just installed CentOS 5, as your host operating system for the latest version of VMware Server, 1.0.3. However, vmware-config.pl tells you it is missing something.

libXtst.so.6

What is libXtst.so.6? Well, to keep a long story short, libXtst.so.6 is a set of shared libraries that are used by the X Windows system. Although the term X Windows has now been deprecated in place of Xorg, the libraries are still required and still retain the same name.

To install the libraries that you require, just enter the following as root (or you could use sudo if you have it set up nicely):

yum -y install libX11-devel libXtst

Once you have those two and their dependencies installed, vmware will no longer complain about missing components, but you may come across another problem.

VMware requires GCC to be installed, so that it can compile a kernel module and run happily each day forever until the sun goes down. As root, type the following:

yum -y install gcc

OK, so now you have GCC installed. If VMware complains about how it can’t find your “C Header Files”, you may need to do the following, as root:

yum -y install kernel-headers kernel-devel

Now, some people will argue that you just need one, and not the other. In my opinion, just get both. That way when you install something else that needs the other later on, you will already have it! Besides, it’s not like you are giving up gigabytes of space, it’s just a few megabytes.

Lastly, VMware will probably look for your C Header files in the following location:

/usr/src/linux/include

Unfortunately, it won’t be there. As root, type the following:

mkdir /usr/src/linux

cd /usr/src/linux

ln -s /lib/modules/<your current running kernel>/build/include include

Run the setup one last time, and hopefully everything will be fine! Don’t forget to add your selected remote access port to your firewall!

If anyone requires any further assistance, feel free to post a comment here and let me know!

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Tired of putting up with the same 3 – 4 year old ATI OEM graphics drivers that came with your laptop, because your laptop manufacturer has neglected to consider updating the drivers?

Just updated your laptop to Windows Vista, and want better graphics functionality then that of the WDDM driver?

Well, you have come to the right place, well… almost the right place! Check out the link below.

http://www.driverheaven.net/modtool/

That’s right, Mobility Modder modifies the official drivers and adds additional support for your ATI Mobility graphics device, which would otherwise be unsupported. For more information about how this actually work, please read the full documentation available on the same page.

NOTE: Please follow the guide in the link above exactly to the last letter. If you have Windows Vista, it is easy to get caught up at the “disable UAC (User Access Control)” step. There is a link with instructions on the same page. For your convenience, I have included it here also.